5 Ways You Can Use Technology to Support Women

By Faith Macanas

As a feminist, I am always on the lookout for ways to effectively support other women. Luckily, technology has made it easier than ever to share information and resources to support women both locally and globally. We have access to almost unlimited information right at our fingertips, which allows us to get a glimpse into the worlds of women we might not otherwise have ever seen. Better yet, we can use that information to make a difference.

Here are some of my favorite ways you can use technology to support women around the world.

Kiva

Kiva is a microlending site that connects people around the world with resources. Potential borrowers can submit loan requests, outlining how they plan to use the money. The requests come from all over the globe and can be for anything from educational expenses to small business costs and more. Lenders then contribute to loans in $25 increments.

On the Kiva.org site, you can review profiles and choose to support women requesting money in categories such as agriculture, retail businesses and even those trying to make a better life in conflict zones. Since the money is a loan, you receive updates as it Read more

Not Just Here for Your Entertainment: The Real Stories Behind OITNB

By Robyn Di Giacinto

Fangirls rejoice—the new season of OITNB has dropped in all its feminist glory!

YAAASSS (image via popsugar.com)

Since OITNB hit Netflix in 2013, it’s become a force to be reckoned with, weaving together engaging storytelling, a dynamic ensemble cast, and groundbreaking commentary on social issues that most mainstream shows are too afraid to even hint at.

In particular, OITNB was the first real introduction many viewers had to the ever-expanding world of American prisons. And that’s part of the appeal: in a sea of primetime cop shows and law-and-order-obsessed nightly news programs, OITNB is one of the only shows that dares to challenge the idea that criminal justice is always just. Litchfield Penitentiary isn’t just where we put the “criminals.” Its prisoners are people with complicated stories not so unlike our own.

…But it’s also entertainment. Lucrative entertainment at that. The kind that draws in millions of subscribers and drives advertising revenues through the roof. And while that doesn’t cancel out the show’s importance, whose interests are your marathon binge-watching sessions, Facebook rants and Twitter epiphanies really serving — those of actual women in prison, or the profit margins at Netflix HQ?

It’s not a comfortable … Read more

Bernie lost. Let’s move on.

This election has really tested my patience.

We’ve got unapologetic racists and xenophobes on the right and conspiracy theorists on the left.

Here’s the truth: Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are going to battle for the presidency this November. Hillary has clinched the number of delegates she needs to be the Democratic nominee. There’s no “media conspiracy.” There’s no “false reporting” going on. She’s literally gotten millions of more votes than Bernie.

I understand why Bernie supporters are upset. If this outcome were flipped, I’d be pissed too. However, I do not think I would claim that the “system is rigged” or the “media is owned by Clinton.” Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose. That’s life.

In 2008 Hillary dropped out of the race when Obama had less of a lead than she does today. She valued party unity above her own pride. Bernie, however, plans to contest the nomination through the convention. He also has said that he does not plan to rally behind Clinton.

Bernie is a sore loser. And his campaign is sending dangerous messages to his supporters. He’s making them believe that they are entitled to win. However, whichever way you look at it, they have … Read more

Stand #withMalala for Girl’s Education

 

I have a very special announcement to share with you, feminist felines:

 

Tonight at 8:00 pm ET/7:00 pm CT the National Geographic Channel is playing a COMMERCIAL-FREE premiere of He Named Me Malala!

 

You may know Malala Yousafzai as the youngest person to win the Nobel Peace Prize. But do you know her full story?

 

In 2013 Malala was shot in the head by the Taliban for daring to stand up for girls’ education. Now, acclaimed documentary filmmaker Davis Guggenheim (An Inconvenient TruthIt Might Get Loud) is telling Malala’s story about her incredible journey and her work to ensure every girl has access to 12 years of free, quality, safe education.

 

Check out the trailer below:

 

I am super pumped to be hosting a watch party tonight with my kitties in the comfort of my own home. I hope that you all will join me too!

 

 

BONUS: Tweet #withMalala!

  1. Through March 10,
Read more

Don’t You Dare Defund Planned Parenthood

Over three years ago, my friend Taylor Kuether​ wrote this editorial in her school paper about signs she saw at a pro-life rally that read “Defund Planned Parenthood.” Unfortunately, it’s 2015 and Republicans in Congress are now threatening to shutdown the government in order to do just that. It’s disgraceful that women’s health services are such a point of contention in America. Since when did body autonomy become a political issue? In honor of Planned Parenthood’s #PinkOut Day, this piece is being republished on The Feminist Feline to show just how grave of a situation women’s health is in in America.


Last week marked the 39th anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s highly controversial ruling in Roe v. Wade, in which abortion was made permissible with a few stipulations including protecting prenatal life, protecting women’s health, and regulating the trimester in which abortions could be carried out.

Yearly, thousands participate in the “March for Life” protest in Washington, D.C. on the anniversary of the famous ruling. This year, when glancing over photos from the event, one sign caught my eye: “Defund Planned Parenthood.”

I saw similar signs last summer as I drove down Menomonie Street right here in Eau … Read more

Can’t Miss #WomenStreetCinema Screening on August 26!

Shira Hereld, contributing writer at The Feminist Feline, works at Street Sense, an organization that elevates voices on poverty issues and creates economic opportunities for people experiencing homelessness in Washington, DC. She wanted to share this exciting event with readers: 

In DC, at least 7,000 individuals have no place to stay on any given night.
The experience of homelessness is traumatizing, dehumanizing, and
terrifying, particularly for women trying to remain safe on the street and
in shelters. But every so often, some of these talented women manage to
break the cycle of homelessness and speak their truths.

On August 26th, two African-American female directors will present short
films documenting their struggles to survive and elevate themselves above
homelessness in Cinema from the Street, Part 2.

Join a courageous mother as she struggles to protect and raise her daughter
in one of D.C.’s most infamous and inhospitable shelters. Then, journey
alongside a survivor of homelessness and sexual assault as she reflects on
her past trauma and present path to recovery.

Here’s the incredible trailer:

Date: Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Time: 6:30 – 8:30 pm

Place: Landmark’s E Street Cinema, 555 11th St NW, Washington, District of Columbia 20004Read more

Real Issues Are Scary so Here’s a Distraction: Alpha Phi and the Art of Changing the Subject

By Sierra O’Mara Schwartz

When I first saw the Alpha Phi chapter at the University of Alabama’s recruitment video pop up on my news feed, I figured it was posted by some guy in a frat I went to college with or by an Alpha Phi I’d met during my undergrad. I went to a fairly Greek school, so my timeline being flooded with recruitment videos is nothing out of the ordinary. But when I discovered this clip was not from a Facebook friend, but rather ABC News, I was a little confused.

Here is the video:

It seems pretty standard: pretty girls throwing glitter, laughing, mugging for the camera, gyrating in slow motion. But this particular recruitment video, for whatever reason, has stood out enough to warrant significant backlash. Alpha Phi’s seemingly harmless, fairly standard sorority recruitment video has gone viral after an op-ed was written criticizing it’s lack of diversity and blatant “anti-feminist” message. As expected, media outlets are eating this story up. The entire internet has bandwagoned and is now on a death mission to take down the University of Alabama’s Alpha Phi chapter for being “worse for women than Donald Trump.” The author claims that these … Read more

After the Silence: My Sexual Assault Recovery

By Shira Hereld

Some days I still can’t find words for it. They all feel too clinical or too violent or too removed – mostly they don’t feel like enough. Enough for the turbulent thunderstorm that threatens the periphery of my memories whenever I tread too near – the admixture of panic, shame, anger, and a thousand other potent emotions too complicated to name.

But that’s why I wanted to write this: because, two years to the day after I was assaulted, and only a year and a half after I finally shattered my silence and wrote about it, it’s time to take stock of how far I’ve come. To try and put some words to it – in the hopes that other survivors will see that there is a journey called “recovery,” and so that I can at last gain the power of believing I’m on it.

So many things have changed since the days, weeks, and months after the assault.

First and most importantly, I can call it the unspeakable R-word – Rape – and relieve in small increments the enormous shame and guilt I have accrued around its memory. I have also shared my story … Read more

The Top 10 #LoveWins Memes

I think we can all agree that last week was PRETTY COOL for America. SCOTUS not only upheld Obamacare; they also prohibited all 50 states from denying marriage licenses to same-sex couples. Although there’s still much to do in the fight for equality (ie trans* workers’ rights, access to health care for undocumented immigrants, ending homelessness in LGBT youth, equal pay for all genders, taking down that horribly racist flag, and more…), Friday’s landmark decision deserves celebration. And what a better time to celebrate than the week of July 4?!

So in no particular order, here are my 10 favorite #LoveWins (RIP to those adorable rainbow hearts on Twitter </3) memes, thanks to The Internet:

1. The Gay Agenda

1 down, 9 to go.

Posted by BuzzFeed BFF on Friday, June 26, 2015

I personally will fight to bring back 2001 Britney.

 

2. Because Massachusetts paved the way for equality!

http://scullyseviltwin.tumblr.com/post/122505149858

   

3. Don’t forget the important lesson in the Bible on why you must unfriend all the bigots on Facebook:

bye-felicia

facebook.com

4. Speaking of Bye Felicia…

bye-scalia

facebook.com/sierra.schwartz

 

5. Because Hillary = bae

 

Map of the day/week/month/year/decade/century/millennium. Share if you live in

Read more

Historical Context and Why It’s Important

By Alex Miller

Last week, as I was scrolling through my feed on Twitter in an attempt to avoid writing a paper for class, I came across this tweet:

 

w'all tweet

First off I’d like to say this post is not about shaming the person who tweeted this, but is an attempt to get us thinking about the consequences of what we say from an informed perspective. This perspective takes a very important factor into account—historical context. Historical context is, briefly, all the events and circumstances that surround and build up to an event happening in the present. One person recently described it to me in terms of an iceberg—the part above the water’s surface is what is happening now, what you can see, but the part below the surface is the historical context. And as we know, most of an iceberg sits beneath the surface.

Back to our aforementioned tweet. The person who tweeted this was a Yankee living in a Southern state, so naturally he incurred some backlash. One passionate responder attempted to reason with the tweeter, through various arguments, that “w’all” doesn’t sound “just as stupid” as “y’all,” but he was unable to clearly articulate what I could … Read more

Next Page »